We're hiring!
*

Open Build Service in Debian - Part 1

Héctor Orón Martínez avatar

Héctor Orón Martínez
October 24, 2016

Share this post:

“Open Build Service is a generic system to build and distribute packages from sources in an automatic, consistent and reproducible way.”

openSUSE distributions’ build system is based on a generic framework named Open Build Service (OBS), I have been using these tools in my work environment, and I have to say, as Debian developer, that it is a great tool. In this blog post I plan for you to learn the very basics of such tool and provide you with a tutorial to get, at least, a Debian package building.

Figure 1. Open Build Service Architecture.

 

The figure above shows Open Build Service, from now on OBS, software architecture. There are several parts which we should differenciate:

  • Web UI / API (obs-api)
  • Backend (obs-server)
  • Build daemon / worker (obs-worker)
  • CLI tool to manage API (osc)

Each one of the above packages can be installed in separated machines as a distributed architecture, it is very easy to split the system into several machines running the services, however in the tutorial below everything installs in one machine.


BACKEND

The backend is composed of several scripts written either in shell or Perl. There are several services running in the backend:

  • Source service
  • Repository service
  • Scheduler service
  • Dispatcher service
  • Warden service
  • Publisher service
  • Signer service
  • DoD service

The backend manages source packages (any format such RPM, DEB, …) and schedules them for a build in the worker. Once the package is built it can be published in a repository for the wider audience or kept unpublished and used by other builds.


WORKER

System can have several worker machines which are encharged to perform the package builds. There are different options that can be configured (see /etc/default/obsworker) such enabling switch, number of worker instances, jobs per instance. This part of the system is written in shell and/or Perl language.


WEB UI / API

The frontend allows in a clickable way to get around most options OBS provides: setup projects, upload/branch/delete packages, submit review requests, etc. As an example, you can see a live instance running at https://build.opensuse.org/

The frontend parts are really a Ruby-on-rails web application, we (mainly thanks to Andrew Lee with ruby team help) have tried to get it nicely running, however we have had lots of issues due to javascripts or rubygems malfunctioning. Current webui is visible and provides some package status, however most actions do not work properly, or configurations cannot be applied as editor does not save changes, projects or packages in a project are not listed either. If you are a Ruby-on-rails expert or if you are able to help us out with some of the webui issues we get at Debian that would be really appreciated from our side.


OSC CLI

OSC is a managing command line tool, written in Python, that interfaces with OBS API to be able to perform actions, edit configurations, do package reviews, etc.



Now that we have done a general overview of the system, in the next blog post I'll introduce you to OBS with a practical tutorial.

Continue reading (Open Build Service in Debian - Part 2)

Related Posts

Related Posts

Comments (1)

  1. henne:
    Oct 24, 2016 at 05:22 PM

    Hola Héctor! I'm willing to help with the Rails problems you are experiencing. Get in contact please

    Reply to this comment

    Reply to this comment


Add a Comment






Allowed tags: <b><i><br>Add a new comment:


Search the newsroom

Latest Blog Posts

An easy to use MTP implementation for your next embedded Linux project

13/04/2021

Did you know you could run a permissively-licensed MTP implementation with minimal dependencies on an embedded device? Here's a step-by-step…

Rust: integrating LLVM source-base code coverage with GitLab

24/03/2021

Earlier this year, the Rust compiler gained support for LLVM source-base code coverage. In this post we'll explain how to setup a CI job…

Build and run GTK 4 applications with Visual Studio

18/03/2021

Over the past few months, I've been working on a side project to improve Meson sub-project support. The best stress test is to build projects…

New features, changes & improvements to KernelCI's UI

04/03/2021

The most complete automated testing and continuous integration tool for the Linux kernel continues to evolve at a rapid pace. Here's a look…

Asymmetric Multi Processing with Linux & Zephyr on the STM32MP1

03/03/2021

In the embedded world, many modern SoCs such as the ST Microelectronics STM32MP1 now include coprocessor cores which can be used for a wide…

Adding HEVC/H.265 support for NXP's i.MX 8M

17/02/2021

Our recent efforts on the Hantro kernel driver have resulted in the addition of H.264 decoding support and multiple performance improvements.…

Open Since 2005 logo

We use cookies on this website to ensure that you get the best experience. By continuing to use this website you are consenting to the use of these cookies. To find out more please follow this link.

Collabora Ltd © 2005-2021. All rights reserved. Privacy Notice. Sitemap.

Collabora Limited is registered in England and Wales. Company Registration number: 5513718. Registered office: The Platinum Building, St John's Innovation Park, Cambridge, CB4 0DS, United Kingdom. VAT number: 874 1630 19.